Local Public Health Alert: COVID-19 infection rates remain high in Mesa County.  Click here to learn more.

Español English

Main Phone Line
(970) 248-6900


sAFETY
IS A SHARED RESPONSIBILITY FOR PEDESTRIANS AND
DRIVERS.
  • A Mesa
    County child was hit by a car while walking to school, this week.
  • Drivers and
    pedestrians alike should take precautions to stay safe, especially during busy
    times, between 6 a.m. and 9 a.m. and 2:30 and 5 p.m.
  • Tips for drivers:
    • Look out for
      pedestrians everywhere, at all times.
    • Slow down
      and be prepared to stop when turning or otherwise entering a crosswalk.
    • Never pass
      vehicles stopped at crosswalks –people may be crossing that you can’t see.
    • More than
      3,000 people were killed in 2014 distracted driving crashes – 520 of those
      people weren’t in the vehicle. Don’t be
      a distracted driver. Put your phone away.
    • Be extra
      cautious when backing up – pedestrians can move into your path.
  • Tips for pedestrians:
    • Always walk
      on the sidewalk facing traffic. If there is no sidewalk, walk along the
      shoulder of the road, also facing traffic.
    • Cross
      streets at marked crosswalks or intersections if possible.
    • Don’t rely
      on pedestrian signals. Look left, right and left again before crossing a
      street.
    • Watch for
      turning vehicles. Make sure the driver sees you and will stop for you.
    • Don’t play
      games on a cellphone, talk on a cell phone or wear headphones while crossing.
  • Safety is a
    shared responsibility. Be a courteous and observant driver and/or pedestrian.

Take
precautions to reduce exposure to wildfire smoke
  • Multiple
    wildfires are creating smoke across Colorado, including the 621 acre Spring
    Creek 2 Wildfire, burning in Mesa County, about 5 miles south of Parachute.
  • Although recent
    updates indicate the fire is 70 percent contained, smoke may continue to impact
    residents.
  • If smoke is
    thick or becomes thick in your neighborhood, consider remaining indoors.
    • This is especially true for sensitive
      groups, such as people with heart disease, respiratory illnesses, the very
      young and the elderly.
  • Limit
    outdoor activity when moderate or heavy smoke is present.
  • Sensitive
    groups should reduce prolonged or heavy exertion.
  • If smoke is
    thick, turn off your swamp cooler to help keep smoke from entering your home.
  • Consider
    running an errand or relocating temporarily to a building with a closed cooling
    system, like a mall or grocery store, if smoke is present indoors and is making
    you ill.
  • If visibility is less than
    five miles in your neighborhood due to smoke, smoke has reached levels that are
    unhealthy.
  • Contact your health care provider if you experience respiratory
    symptoms such as shortness of breath, coughing and sore throat.