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MCPH issues wildfire smoke advisory due to Pine Gulch Fire

MCPH issues wildfire smoke advisory due to Pine Gulch Fire

Mesa County Public Health (MCPH) has issued a smoke advisory beginning Wednesday, August 5 due to smoke from the Pine Gulch Fire, approximately 20 miles north of Grand Junction. It is expected that air quality issues due to wildfire smoke will continue for an extended period as crews work to control the growing fire. MCPH will notify residents when the advisory is lifted.

Periods of moderate to heavy smoke can be expected and the highest impact areas include locations near the fire in rural northern Mesa County and southwestern Garfield County, including Hunter Canyon, Corcoran Wash, South Dry Fork, and locations west of Garfield County Road 222.

Remember, if smoke is thick in your area, stay inside – especially if you have heart disease or respiratory illness. Infants, very young children and elderly residents are also advised to stay inside if smoke becomes thick. All residents should consider limiting heavy physical outdoor activity when moderate to heavy smoke is present and consider relocating temporarily if smoke is present indoors and is making you ill.

If visibility is less than five miles due to smoke in your neighborhood, smoke has reached levels that are unhealthy. 

Fire safety conditions also remain a concern. Hot temperatures, low humidity, and strong winds have prompted the national weather service to issue a Red Flag Warning for much of Western Colorado beginning Thursday August 6. Stage 1 Fire Restrictions have been in place in Mesa County since June 26, meaning that open burning is not allowed. 

For information on current air quality conditions, visit the air quality page on our website.

NO BURN ADVISORY through July 8 due to fire safety concerns

NO BURN ADVISORY through July 8 due to fire safety concerns

UPDATE:  This advisory has been extended through July 8 at 9 p.m.

Due to fire safety concerns, Mesa County Public Health has issued no burn advisory through July 8 at 9 p.m. Burning of any kind, including agricultural burning, is not allowed during this advisory period. 

The National Weather Service has issued a Red Flag Warning for Mesa County and other areas across the Western Slope. The combination of gusty winds, low relative humidity, and dry fuels will result in critical fire weather conditions. 

Mesa County Public Health reminds residents of the Stage 1 fire restrictions in place which means no open burning is allowed without a special permit from the Mesa County Sheriff’s Office.

Stage 1 fire restrictions were announced on June 26 and prohibit:

  • Personal use of fireworks
  • Campfires outside of designated fire pits or fire rings
  • Agricultural open burning without a Sheriff’s issued burn permit
  • Use of explosive targets
  • Smoking outside near combustible materials.

Spring Burn Season ended May 31 and was suspended in mid-March due to concerns with the COVID-19 pandemic and its associated threat to people with heart and/or lung disease. Instead of burning, consider these alternatives:

  • Take yard waste to the Mesa County Organic Materials composting facility at Mesa County Solid Waste, 3071 U.S. Hwy. 50. The facility accepts material for composting at no charge and is open Thursday-Saturday, 8 a.m. – 4:15 p.m. 
  • Compost leaves and grass clippings yourself. This can improve water retention in your yard or garden.
  • Rent or borrow a wood chipper for your tree and shrub trimmings. Chipped branches can also be good mulch.

 

NO BURN ADVISORY through July 8 due to fire safety concerns

MCPH Issues NO BURN ADVISORY through June 7 due to fire safety concerns

Due to fire safety concerns, Mesa County Public Health has issued a no burn advisory through Sunday, June 7 at 9 p.m. No open burning is allowed, including agricultural burns. 

The National Weather Service has issued a Red Flag Warning for Mesa County and other areas across the Western Slope. The combination of gusty winds, low relative humidity, and dry fuels will result in critical fire weather conditions. High winds are forecast to continue through the weekend, gusting as high as 40 miles per hour. Burning of any kind, including open burning, is not allowed during this advisory period.  

Spring Burn Season ended May 31 and was suspended in mid-March due to concerns with the COVID-19 pandemic and its associated threat to people with heart and/or lung disease.

Instead of burning, consider these alternatives:

  • Take yard waste to the Mesa County Organic Materials composting facility at Mesa County Solid Waste, 3071 U.S. Hwy. 50. The facility accepts material for composting at no charge and is open Thursday-Saturday, 8 a.m. – 4:15 p.m. 
  • Compost leaves and grass clippings yourself. This can improve water retention in your yard or garden.
  • Rent or borrow a wood chipper for your tree and shrub trimmings. Chihttps://health.mesacounty.uspped branches can also be good mulch.

For information on current air quality and fire weather conditions and to learn if it’s OK to burn, visit the air quality page on our website

MCPH Issues NO BURN ADVISORY for Friday, May 22 due to fire safety concerns

MCPH Issues NO BURN ADVISORY for Friday, May 22 due to fire safety concerns

Due to fire safety concerns, Mesa County Public Health has issued a no burn advisory through 9 p.m. on Friday, May 22. No open burning is allowed, including agricultural burns. 

The National Weather Service has issued a Red Flag Warning for Mesa County and other areas across the Western Slope. The combination of gusty winds, low relative humidity, and dry fuels create conditions favorable for the rapid ignition, growth, and spread of fires. Burning of any kind, including open burning, is not allowed during this alert period.  

Due to concerns with the COVID-19 pandemic and its associated threat to people with heart and/or lung disease, Mesa County Public Health has issued a No Burn Advisory for residential burning indefinitely.

Instead of burning, consider these alternatives:

  • Take yard waste to the Mesa County Organic Materials composting facility at Mesa County Solid Waste, 3071 U.S. Hwy. 50. The facility accepts material for composting at no charge and is open Thursday-Saturday, 8 a.m. – 4:15 p.m. 
  • Compost leaves and grass clippings yourself. This can improve water retention in your yard or garden.
  • Rent or borrow a wood chipper for your tree and shrub trimmings. Chipped branches can also be good mulch.

 

For information on current air quality and fire weather conditions and to learn if it’s OK to burn, visit our website

NO BURN ADVISORY through July 8 due to fire safety concerns

MCPH Issues NO BURN ADVISORY for Wednesday, May 13 due to fire safety concerns

Mesa County Public Health has issued a No Burn Advisory for Wednesday, May 13, from 12:00 p.m. until 9:00 p.m. Due to fire safety concerns, no open burning is allowed, including agricultural burns. 

The National Weather Service has issued a Red Flag Warning for Mesa County and other areas across the Western Slope. The combination of gusty winds, low relative humidity, and dry fuels will result in critical fire weather conditions. Burning of any kind, including open burning, is not allowed during this alert period.  

Due to concerns with the COVID-19 pandemic and its associated threat to people with heart and/or lung disease, Mesa County Public Health has issued a No Burn Advisory for residential burning indefinitely.

Instead of burning, consider these alternatives:

  • Take yard waste to the Mesa County Organic Materials composting facility at Mesa County Solid Waste, 3071 U.S. Hwy. 50. The facility accepts material for composting at no charge and is open Thursday-Saturday, 8 a.m. – 4:15 p.m. 
  • Compost leaves and grass clippings yourself. This can improve water retention in your yard or garden.
  • Rent or borrow a wood chipper for your tree and shrub trimmings. Chipped branches can also be good mulch.

For information on current air quality and fire weather conditions and to learn if it’s OK to burn, visit the air quality page on our website

NO BURN ADVISORY through July 8 due to fire safety concerns

Residential Open Burning Suspended Indefinitely Due to High-Risk Populations Impacted by COVID-19

Mesa County Public Health has made the decision to issue a NO BURN ADVISORY indefinitely. This advisory means residential open burning is not allowed. We will evaluate and issue guidance when it is once again OK to burn. 

COVID-19 is a lower respiratory illness impacting residents with underlying medical conditions, more severely than other groups. This decision was made to ensure the best possible air quality for residents in high-risk categories, and to ensure our medical community has enough resources to care for the patients impacted by COVID-19.

We recognize burning is a tool used to prepare fields and watering sources for production. This advisory only applies to residential burns at this time, but we ask our agricultural community to be aware of the health impacts on those most at risk for COVID-19 and consider other options, if possible.

We know our community is looking for ways to do their part and help those who are most vulnerable to this illness; refraining from burning is one way we can be good neighbors and respond as a community.

Instead of burning, consider these alternatives:

  • Take yard waste to the Mesa County Organic Materials composting facility at Mesa County Solid Waste, 3071 U.S. Hwy. 50. The facility accepts material for composting at no charge and is open from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Tuesday – Saturday. For more information, call (970) 263-9319.
  • Compost leaves and grass clippings yourself. This can improve water retention in your yard or garden.
  • Rent or borrow a wood chipper for your tree and shrub trimmings. Chipped branches can also be good mulch.