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No Burn Advisory Due to Strong Winds

No Burn Advisory Due to Strong Winds

Contact: Alli Howe
Call/Text: 970-697-4611
Email: healthinfo@mesacounty.us

NO BURN ADVISORY DUE TO HIGH WIND CONDITIONS

Due to fire safety concerns, Mesa County Public Health has issued a no burn advisory from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. on April 29. Burning of any kind, including agricultural burning, is not allowed during this advisory period.

The National Weather Service forecast calls for west winds 25 to 35 mph with gusts up to 50 mph expected.

Conditions are not appropriate for burning. Instead of burning, consider these alternatives:

  • Take yard waste to the Mesa County Organic Materials composting facility at Mesa County Solid Waste, 3071 U.S. Hwy. 50. The facility accepts material for composting at no charge and is open Wednesday – Saturday, 8 a.m. – 4:15 p.m. For more information, call (970) 263-9319.
  • Compost leaves and grass clippings yourself. This can improve water retention in your yard or garden.
  • Rent or borrow a wood chipper for your tree and shrub trimmings. Chipped branches can also be good mulch.

For information on current air quality conditions and to learn if it’s OK to burn, visit the air quality page.

Food Safety Alert: Ground Beef Products Recalled

Food Safety Alert: Ground Beef Products Recalled

Contact: Alli Howe
Call/Text: 970-697-4611
Email: healthinfo@mesacounty.us

FOOD SAFETY ALERT: GROUND BEEF PRODUCTS RECALLED DUE TO POSSIBLE E. COLI CONTAMINATION

Background

  • Mesa County Public Health has been made aware of ground beef products being recalled that could have been distributed in Mesa County.
  • The manufacturer, Lakeside Refrigerated Services, is recalling more than 120-thousand pounds of ground beef products shipped to retail locations nationwide that may be contaminated with E. coli O103.
    • E. coli are a large and diverse group of bacteria. Although most strains of E. coli are harmless, others can make you sick.
    • The specific type found in these products, a Shiga toxin-producing E. coli known as O103, can cause serious illness.
  • There have been no confirmed reports of illness or adverse reactions due to consumption of these products.
  • Most people show symptoms 3-4 days after being infected with E. coli O103. Common symptoms are diarrhea (often bloody) and vomiting. Some illnesses last longer and can be more severe. 

Description of Recalled Products

  • The complete list of products and product codes for the beef products that are subject to recall can be found here. 
  • The products subject to recall bear establishment number “EST. 46841” inside the USDA mark of inspection.  
  • Labels for the ground beef products can be found here.

Examples of Labels

What Should Consumers Do

  • USDA is concerned that some products may be in consumers’ refrigerators or freezers.
  • If you have any of the described products, do not eat them. Throw them away or return them.

Further Questions

  • Consumers with questions regarding the recall can contact Lakeside Refrigerated Services at 800-493-9042 or customercare@lakesiderefrigerated.com.
  • Consumers with food safety questions can call the toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline at 888-MPHotline (888-674-6854) or live chat via Ask USDA from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday.
Highly Contagious Avian Influenza Spreading in Colorado

Highly Contagious Avian Influenza Spreading in Colorado

Background

  • Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza, often referred to as bird flu, is a disease found in wild and domestic birds caused by the Avian Influenza A (H5N1) virus.
  • Wild birds can be infected with bird flu and show no signs of illness. They can carry the disease to new areas when migrating, potentially exposing domestic poultry to the virus.
  • No human cases have been detected in the United States. 
  • The risk to domestic poultry is high, so monitoring the disease is critical to flocks. 
  • The health risk to humans is low, however, some people may have job-related or recreational exposures to birds that put them at higher risk of infection.

Regional Situation

  • Cases have been confirmed in a commercial poultry operation in Montrose County and in backyard flocks in La Plata and Pitkin counties.  
  • The Colorado Department of Agriculture has set up a quarantine perimeter in Montrose County and is working with producers to protect flocks.

Public Health Recommendations

  • As a general precaution, whenever possible people should avoid direct contact with wild birds and observe them only from a distance.
  • Minimize contact with wild birds or sick or dead poultry by wearing gloves and washing your hands with soap and water after touching birds. If available, wear respiratory protection, such as a medical facemask.
  • Hunters should wear gloves when dressing game birds and wash their hands with soap and water after.
  • Watch for symptoms in domestic birds including lack of energy or appetite, soft-shelled or misshappen eggs, and lack of coordination.
  • Do not touch surfaces that may be contaminated with saliva, mucus or feces from wild or domestic birds.

To Report Disease

  • It is important for veterinarians and producers to report any suspicious disease events in poultry flocks to the State Veterinarian’s office at 303-869-9130. If it is after hours, the voicemail message will indicate which veterinarian is on call. 
  • If you have sick birds or birds that have died from unknown causes, help is available at the Colorado Avian Health call line at Colorado State University, their number is 970-297-4008.

No Burn Advisory Due to Strong Winds

No Burn Advisory Due to Adverse Weather Conditions

Due to fire safety concerns, Mesa County Public Health has issued a no burn advisory from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. on April 21. Burning of any kind, including agricultural burning, is not allowed during this advisory period.

The National Weather Service has issued a Red Flag Warning for Mesa County and other areas across the Western Slope. The combination of gusty winds, low relative humidity, warm temperatures, and dry fuels will result in critical fire weather conditions. 

Instead of burning, consider these alternatives:

  • Take yard waste to the Mesa County Organic Materials composting facility at Mesa County Solid Waste, 3071 U.S. Hwy. 50. The facility accepts material for composting at no charge and is open Wednesday – Saturday, 8 a.m. – 4:15 p.m. For more information, call (970) 263-9319.
  • Compost leaves and grass clippings yourself. This can improve water retention in your yard or garden.
  • Rent or borrow a wood chipper for your tree and shrub trimmings. Chipped branches can also be good mulch.

For information on current air quality conditions and to learn if it’s OK to burn, visit the air quality page.

Whooping Cough Cases on the Rise in Western and Southwestern Colorado

Whooping Cough Cases on the Rise in Western and Southwestern Colorado

Protect yourself with vaccination. If you are sick, test, treat and remain at home.

Though COVID-19 cases are declining across Colorado, other respiratory infections continue to circulate. Reported cases of pertussis, or whooping cough, were very low in Colorado from 2020 to 2021, but have increased in 2022.

According to data from the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE), 29 cases have been reported statewide since January, compared to seven cases reported during the same time period in 2021. Of the 29 cases reported this year, 14 were reported since March from southwest/western Colorado including Delta and Montrose counties. The cases range in age from 10 months to 77 years. There have been no reported hospitalizations or deaths and zero cases reported in Mesa County.

Whooping cough is spread when a person who is sick with the illness coughs or sneezes and another person breathes in those droplets left in the air. The illness is known for causing coughing fits, vomiting after coughing, exhaustion, and, sometimes, a high-pitched “whoop” sound during coughing. Whooping cough can be very dangerous for infants younger than a year old, as they are too young to be fully immunized against the illness.

Residents, especially pregnant mothers and those spending time around infants, should make sure they are up-to-date on their immunizations. There are several different types of vaccines that can safely prevent pertussis and other illnesses.  The CDC recommends:

    • Pregnant women should receive a Tdap dose during the third trimester of every pregnancy.
    • Babies need DTaP doses at two, four, and six months of age, and again between 15 and 18 months.
    • Children and preteens should get five doses of the DTaP vaccine and a Tdap vaccine booster.
    • Adults should get one dose of Tdap or Td every 10 years. Adults who have never received Tdap should get Tdap in place of a Td dose.

Families are also encouraged to stay home from work, school, or child care when they are sick and to practice good hand washing to help prevent the spread of illness in our community.

MCPH offers DTaP and Tdap immunizations and accepts all major health insurance plans including Medicaid, Medicare, and the Children’s Health Insurance Plan. We also have programs for those without insurance and serve all patients regardless of ability to pay.

No Burn Advisory Due to Strong Winds

No Burn Advisory Due to Adverse Weather Conditions

Due to fire safety concerns, Mesa County Public Health has issued no burn advisory through 10 p.m. on April 19. Burning of any kind, including agricultural burning, is not allowed during this advisory period. 

The National Weather Service has issued a Red Flag Warning for Mesa County and other areas across the Western Slope. The combination of gusty winds, low relative humidity, warm temperatures, and dry fuels will result in critical fire weather conditions. 

Instead of burning, consider these alternatives:

  • Take yard waste to the Mesa County Organic Materials composting facility at Mesa County Solid Waste, 3071 U.S. Hwy. 50. The facility accepts material for composting at no charge and is open Wednesday – Saturday, 8 a.m. – 4:15 p.m. For more information, call (970) 263-9319.
  • Compost leaves and grass clippings yourself. This can improve water retention in your yard or garden.
  • Rent or borrow a wood chipper for your tree and shrub trimmings. Chipped branches can also be good mulch.

For information on current air quality conditions and to learn if it’s OK to burn, visit our website.