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protect our infants by getting
immunized
·        
Several
cases of pertussis, more commonly known as whooping cough, have been reported
in infants in Mesa County.
·        
The
majority contracted the disease through parents or close family members.
·        
Whooping
cough can cause serious complications and can even be fatal for infants and
toddlers.
·        
The
best way to prevent pertussis outbreaks in our community is with DTaP and Tdap
immunization.
o   
Babies
need DTaP doses at two, four and six months of age and again between 15 and 18
months.
o   
Children
need another DTaP dose between the ages of four and six.
o   
Children
between seven and 10 years need a dose of Tdap if they’ve never been immunized.
Children between 11 and 12 years need Tdap immunization, as well.
o   
Adults
need one dose of Tdap.
o   
Pregnant
women should receive a Tdap dose during the third trimester of pregnancy.
§  It’s also recommended family members
who will come in close contact with an infant receive Tdap immunization.
·        
If you are ill, avoid contact with
infants – even if you are family.
·        
Early
whooping cough symptoms include runny nose, low-grade fever and a mild,
occasional cough – it’s not uncommon for the cough to last for weeks or months.
·        
Later
stage whooping cough symptoms include coughing fits, exhaustion, vomiting after
coughing and a high pitched “whoop” while coughing.
·        
Contact
your health care provider immediately if you, your infant or child show
symptoms of whooping cough.
·        
Mesa
County Health Department provides DTaP and Tdap immunizations. Call 248-6900 to
make an appointment.
Small game hunting tips to prevent
tularemia infection
·        
Small
game season for several rabbits and hares, fox, pine squirrel and beavers
begins Oct. 1.
·        
All
of these animals can carry tularemia, a bacterial infection that can be fatal
in humans and animals.
·        
Tularemia
is spread through deer fly and tick bites and contact with infected animals or
carcasses.
·        
Avoid
sick or dead animals. Protect against deer flies and ticks by wearing long
clothing and an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) approved insect repellant
effective against ticks.
·        
Do not allow your pets to consume animal
carcasses. They could contract tularemia and pass it on to you.
·        
Wear
rubber gloves when handling animal tissues, recommended even if the animal
doesn’t appear to be sick. Be sure to
wear gloves when field dressing the animal to protect against fluids and
parasites.
·        
Bag
carcasses or pelts and dispose in an outside garbage can, away from people and
pets.
·        
Cook
meat to 160 degrees Fahrenheit or until it is well done to kill all bacteria.
·        
Tularemia
is treatable. Contact your health care provider if you become ill with high
fever, swollen and painful lymph nodes, skin ulcers, sore throat or respiratory
symptoms such as chest pain or a dry cough.

·        
Contact
your vet if your pet becomes ill with a high fever and/or swollen lymph nodes
after coming into contact with sick or dead animals or after hunting.