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Avoid infection from raw milk
·        
The
sale of raw milk for human consumption is illegal in Colorado, but people can
still purchase a cow share to obtain it.
·        
Raw,
or unpasteurized, milk is a suspected source for illness outbreaks in Colorado,
Michigan and Utah.
·        
Unpasteurized
milk can be dangerous, causing 81 illness outbreaks nationwide from 2007-2012.
o   
More
than half of the outbreaks involved children younger than 5.
·        
If
you drink raw milk you may ingest harmful bacteria such as E. coli,
Campylobacter or Salmonella.
o   
The
number of bacteria in raw milk is unpredictable, which makes it unsafe as it
may cause serious, life-threatening illness.
·        
Pasteurized
milk offers many health benefits without running the threat of infection
because it has been heated to kill germs.
·        
Children,
elderly people, pregnant women and those with weakened immune systems have the
highest risk of becoming ill from drinking raw milk.
·        
If
you drink raw milk and start to feel ill, contact your health care provider.
·        
Drink
pasteurized milk to avoid illness.
Stay healthy this canning season
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It’s
canning season in Mesa County. Are you doing everything you can to avoid
getting sick?
·        
Between
1996 and 2008, there were 116 outbreaks of foodborne botulism reported to the
CDC. Thirty eight percent of those tied to home-prepared foods were linked to
home-canned vegetables.
·        
Keep
these tips in mind to avoid getting sick:
o   
Use
a pressure canner or cooker and follow all specified home-canning processing
times for safe home-canning of all foods.
§  Pay special attention to the
processing times for low-acid vegetables, like green beans, carrots and corn.
o    Consult the USDA Complete Guide to Home Canning before you can each season.
o   
Boil
home-processed, low-acid canned foods for 10 minutes before serving.
§  For higher altitudes, add one minute for each 1,000 feet of elevation.
o   
Home-canned
food might be contaminated if:
§  The container is leaking, bulging or
swollen.
§  The container looks damaged, cracked
or abnormal.
§  The container spurts liquid or foam
when opened.
§  The food is discolored, moldy or
smells bad.
o   
Never
taste home-canned foods to determine if they are safe.
o   
Discard
all swollen, gassy or spoiled canned foods.
§  Use rubber gloves and place the food
or can in a sealable bag, then wrap another plastic bag around the sealed bag
and tape it shut.
§  Place bags in a trash receptacle for
non-recyclable trash outside of the
home, away from humans and pets.
§  Wash your hands with soap and running
water for at least two minutes after handling food or containers that may be
contaminated.

·        
Remember,
when in doubt, throw it out!